Lessons Learned From Little House on the Prairie

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In this day and age, it has become increasingly difficult to find wholesome television shows and movies.  As a mother, I am cautious of television and have been continually let down with most of the choices available currently for families and children.  My husband grew up watching old shows with his parents and thus, he has a great love for the classics. Therefore, before our children could walk, he introduced them to many of the old shows.  As family, we watch more old classics, than current and popular television shows. Our children are quite familiar with shows such as, The Andy Griffith Show, Flipper, Leave It To Beaver, Alf, and several other shows from generations before their time.  In addition, they’re even familiar with old television actors, such as The Three Stooges, Fred Estaire, Ginger Rogers and Charlie Chaplain.  I find it very strange, when I hear of children, teenagers, and even young adults who have never heard of these old shows and actors.  I have to remind myself, that we are in fact the minority.  Few people in today’s society appreciate the wholesome messages from the shows and movies of the past.

Recently, I purchased the first season of “The Little House on the Prairie”.  The entire family is watching the show together, from beginning to end.  We watched a beautiful episode tonight, Laura and Mary  were to speak in front of their peers and parents, and share an essay they wrote for school.  Not only did the show bring tears to my eyes, but it convicted my mother’s heart.   In the show, Carolyn the mother, saw a beautiful fabric in the local store.  She struggled with the decision to buy herself something special, but ultimately decided to purchase the material to make herself a dress.  The evening before the girls were to speak in front of the school and all the parents, Mary told her mother she was afraid the other students would laugh at her and not like essay.  Carolyn held her daughter tight and her heart broke for her daughter’s fears.  Carolyn stayed up into the wee hours of the night, working on a special project.  The next day, as the girls were getting dressed, she gave each girl a special dress made from the material she purchased for herself.  The girls were touched deeply, as was I.  Mary’s wrote her essay about her mother.  She discussed how hard-working her mother was, shared how she sacrificed for her family, and told the story of how her mother made them each a special dress out of material she purchased for herself.  As I listened to the essay, I was deeply touched and even more convicted by the profound words spoken.  Mary spoke wonderful accolades about her mother and my heart was convicted.  I realized the importance of being a kind and loving mother.  The past several days, I have been short-tempered, ill mannered, lacking grace, and I was certainly no Carolyn Ingles.  I was convicted of the importance of a mother’s love and how absolutely essential it is to show devout love to my children.  In addition, I was reminded that my children need me to be an example of Christ’s love to their little hearts.

Conviction was a strange feeling and a feeling I haven’t felt in quite awhile.  Let’s be honest, conviction isn’t something we experience often in this day and age.  The world tells us, “If it feels good do it!  If it feels bad, well then “who cares”!  It’s all about me!”  The world tells us to shrug off conviction and move onto… “Whatever makes you happy!”  I admit, tonight my heart needed to be convicted!  I am thankful for this old show and the wonderful lessons taught in each and every episode.  I am thankful that tonight I was reminded of what is most important in life, God, my husband, and my children.

Today, I was blessed with the ability to go back into the past for one hour.  Within that hour, I escaped from today’s anxiety and realized how truly blessed I am.

What are you waiting for?  Go watch yourself some good old “Little House on the Prairie”!

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